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Insights into Vapor-Mediated Interactions in a Nanocolloidal Droplet System: Evaporation Dynamics and Affects on Self-Assembly Topologies on Macro- to Microscales

Shaikeea, Angkur and Basu, Saptarshi and Hatte, Sandeep and Bansal, Lalit (2016) Insights into Vapor-Mediated Interactions in a Nanocolloidal Droplet System: Evaporation Dynamics and Affects on Self-Assembly Topologies on Macro- to Microscales. In: LANGMUIR, 32 (40). pp. 10334-10343.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b03024

Abstract

Particle-laden droplet-based systems ranging from micro- to nanoscale have become increasingly popular in applications such as inkjet printing, pharmaceutics, nanoelectronics, and surface patterning. All such applications involve multidroplet arrays in which vapor-mediated interactions can significantly affect the evaporation dynamics and morphological topology of precipitates. A fundamental study was conducted on nanocolloidal paired droplets (droplets kept adjacent to each other as in an array) to understand the physics related to the evaporation dynamics, internal flow pattern, particle transport, and nanoparticle self-assembly, primarily using optical diagnostic techniques such as micro-particle image velocimetry (mu PIV)]. Paired droplets exhibit contact angle asymmetry, inhomogeneous contact line slip, and unique single-toroid microscale flow, which are unobserved in single droplets. Furthermore, nanoparticles self-assemble (at the nanoscale) to form a unique variable-thickness (microscale) tilted dome-shaped structure that eventually ruptures at an angle because of evaporation at a nanopore scale to form cavities (miniscale). The geometry and morphology of the dome can be further fine-tuned at a macro- to microscale by varying the initial particle concentration and substrate properties. This concept has been extended to a linear array of droplets to showcase how to custom design two-dimensional drop arrangements to create controlled surface patterns at multiple length

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Mechanical Sciences > Mechanical Engineering
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2016 06:49
Last Modified: 03 Dec 2016 06:49
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/55333

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