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Antimicrobial activity of fusidic acid in Escherichia coli is dependent on the relative levels of ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G

Ayyub, Shreya Ahana and Lahry, Kuldeep and Dobriyal, Divya and Mondal, Sanjay and Varshney, Umesh (2018) Antimicrobial activity of fusidic acid in Escherichia coli is dependent on the relative levels of ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G. In: FEMS MICROBIOLOGY LETTERS, 365 (13).

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fny133

Abstract

During protein synthesis, elongation factor G (EFG) participates at the steps of translocation and ribosome recycling. Fusidic acid (FA) is a bacteriostatic antibiotic, which traps EFG on ribosomes, stalling them on mRNAs. How the bacterial susceptibility to FA is determined, and which of the two functions of EFG (translocation or ribosome recycling) is more vulnerable, has remained debatable. The in vivo studies addressing these aspects of FA mediated inhibition of protein synthesis are lacking. Here, we used a system of Escherichia coli strains and their complementation/supplementation with the plasmid borne copies of the inducible versions of EFG and ribosome recycling factor (RRF) genes. Additionally, we investigated FA sensitivity in a strain with increased proportion of stalled ribosomes. We show that the cells with high EFG/RRF (or low RRF/EFG) ratios are more susceptible to FA than those with low EFG/RRF (or high RRF/EFG) ratios. Our in vivo observations are consistent with the recent in vitro reports of dependence of FA susceptibility on EFG/RRF ratios, and the notion that an overriding target of FA is the translocation function of EFG. An applied outcome of our in vivo study is that FA mediated growth inhibition could be facilitated by depletion or inactivation of cellular RRF.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belong to OXFORD UNIV PRESS, GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Microbiology & Cell Biology
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 30 Aug 2018 15:41
Last Modified: 30 Aug 2018 15:41
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/60534

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