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SHOCK-BOUNDARY LAYER INTERACTION AND ENERGETICS IN TRANSONIC FLUTTER

Karnick, Pradeepa T and Venkatraman, Kartik (2017) SHOCK-BOUNDARY LAYER INTERACTION AND ENERGETICS IN TRANSONIC FLUTTER. In: JOURNAL OF FLUID MECHANICS, 832 . pp. 212-240.

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Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1017/jfm.2017.629

Abstract

We study the influence of shock and boundary layer interactions in transonic flutter of an aeroelastic system using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver together with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. We show that the transonic flutter boundary computed using a viscous flow solver can be divided into three distinct regimes: a low transonic Mach number range wherein viscosity mimics increasing airfoil thickness thereby mildly influencing the flutter boundary; an intermediate region of drastic change in the flutter boundary due to shock-induced separation; and a high transonic Mach number zone of no viscous effects when the shock moves close to the trailing edge. Inviscid transonic flutter simulations are a very good approximation of the aeroelastic system in predicting flutter in the first and third regions: that is when the shock is not strong enough to cause separation, and in regions where the shock-induced separated region is confined to a small region near the trailing edge of the airfoil. However, in the second interval of intermediate transonic Mach numbers, the power distribution on the airfoil surface is significantly influenced by shock-induced flow separation on the upper and lower surfaces leading to oscillations about a new equilibrium position. Though power contribution by viscous forces are three orders of magnitude less than the power due to pressure forces, these viscous effects manipulate the flow by influencing the strength and location of the shock such that the power contribution by pressure forces change significantly. Multiple flutter points that were part of the inviscid solution in this regime are now eliminated by viscous effects. Shock motion on the airfoil, shock reversal due to separation, and separation and reattachment of flow on the airfoil upper surface, also lead to multiple aerodynamic forcing frequencies. These flow features make the flutter boundary quantitatively sensitive to the turbulence model and numerical method adopted, but qualitatively they capture the essence of the physical phenomena.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 32 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY 10013-2473 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Mechanical Sciences > Aerospace Engineering(Formerly Aeronautical Engineering)
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2017 05:25
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2017 05:25
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/58266

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