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A pyrrole-based natural small molecule mitigates HSP90 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells and inhibits tumor angiogenesis in mice by inactivating HSF-1

Rashmi, KC and Atreya, HS and Raj, Harsha M and Salimath, Bharathi P and Aparna, Hanudatta S (2017) A pyrrole-based natural small molecule mitigates HSP90 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells and inhibits tumor angiogenesis in mice by inactivating HSF-1. In: CELL STRESS & CHAPERONES, 22 (5). pp. 751-766.

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Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1007/s12192-017-0802-0

Abstract

Heat shock proteins (HSPs), molecular chaperones, are crucial for the cancer cells to facilitate proper functioning of various oncoproteins involved in cell survival, proliferation, migration, and tumor angiogenesis. Tumor cells are said to be ``addicted'' to HSPs. HSPs are overexpressed in many cancers due to upregulation of transcription factor Heat-shock factor 1 (HSF-1), the multifaceted master regulator of heat shock response. Therefore, pharmacological targeting of HSPs via HSF-1 is an effective strategy to treat malignant cancers like triple negative breast cancer. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a pyrrole derivative bis(2-ethylhexyl)1H-pyrrole-3,4-dicarboxylate], TCCP, purified from leaves of Tinospora cordifolia for its ability to suppress heat shock response and angiogenesis using MDA-MB-231 cells and the murine mammary carcinoma: Ehrlich ascites tumor model. HSP90 was downregulated by TCCP by inactivation of HSF-1 resulting in inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, VEGF-induced cell migration, and concomitant decrease in tumor burden and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. The mechanism of suppression of HSPs involves inactivation of PI3K/Akt and phosphorylation on serine 307 of HSF-1 by the activation of ERK1. HSF-1 and HSP90 and 70 localization and expression were ascertained by immunolocalization, immunoblotting, and qPCR experiments. The anti-angiogenic effect of TCCP was studied in vivo in tumor-bearing mice and ex vivo using rat corneal micro-pocket assay. All the results thus corroborate the logic behind inactivating HSF-1 using TCCP as an alternative approach for cancer therapy.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the SPRINGER, VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > NMR Research Centre (Formerly Sophisticated Instruments Facility)
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2017 05:07
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2019 10:48
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/57862

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