ePrints@IIScePrints@IISc Home | About | Browse | Latest Additions | Advanced Search | Contact | Help

Effect of silhouetting and inversion on view invariance in the monkey inferotemporal cortex

Murty, Apurva Ratan and Arun, SP (2017) Effect of silhouetting and inversion on view invariance in the monkey inferotemporal cortex. In: JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, 118 (1). pp. 353-362.

[img] PDF
Jou_Neu_118-1_353_2017.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (1MB) | Request a copy
Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00008.2017

Abstract

We effortlessly recognize objects across changes in viewpoint, but we know relatively little about the features that underlie viewpoint invariance in the brain. Here, we set out to characterize how viewpoint invariance in monkey inferior temporal ( IT) neurons is influenced by two image manipulations-silhouetting and inversion. Reducing an object into its silhouette removes internal detail, so this would reveal how much viewpoint invariance depends on the external contours. Inverting an object retains but rearranges features, so this would reveal how much viewpoint invariance depends on the arrangement and orientation of features. Our main findings are 1) view invariance is weakened by silhouetting but not by inversion; 2) view invariance was stronger in neurons that generalized across silhouetting and inversion; 3) neuronal responses to natural objects matched early with that of silhouettes and only later to that of inverted objects, indicative of coarse-to-fine processing; and 4) the impact of silhouetting and inversion depended on object structure. Taken together, our results elucidate the underlying features and dynamics of view-invariant object representations in the brain. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We easily recognize objects across changes in viewpoint, but the underlying features are unknown. Here, we show that view invariance in the monkey inferotemporal cortex is driven mainly by external object contours and is not specialized for object orientation. We also find that the responses to natural objects match with that of their silhouettes early in the response, and with inverted versions later in the response-indicative of a coarse-to-fine processing sequence in the brain.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the AMER PHYSIOLOGICAL SOC, 9650 ROCKVILLE PIKE, BETHESDA, MD 20814 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Centre for Neuroscience
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2017 06:45
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2019 10:40
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/57618

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item