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Simultaneous analysis of the LFP and spiking activity reveals essential components of a visuomotor transformation in the frontal eye field

Sendhilnathan, Naveen and Basu, Debaleena and Murthy, Aditya (2017) Simultaneous analysis of the LFP and spiking activity reveals essential components of a visuomotor transformation in the frontal eye field. In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 114 (24). pp. 6370-6375.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703809114

Abstract

The frontal eye field (FEF) is a key brain region to study visuomotor transformations because the primary input to FEF is visual in nature, whereas its output reflects the planning of behaviorally relevant saccadic eye movements. In this study, we used a memory-guided saccade task to temporally dissociate the visual epoch from the saccadic epoch through a delay epoch, and used the local field potential (LFP) along with simultaneously recorded spike data to study the visuomotor transformation process. We showed that visual latency of the LFP preceded spiking activity in the visual epoch, whereas spiking activity preceded LFP activity in the saccade epoch. We also found a spatially tuned elevation in gamma band activity (30-70 Hz), but not in the corresponding spiking activity, only during the delay epoch, whose activity predicted saccade reaction times and the cells' saccade tuning. In contrast, beta band activity (13-30 Hz) showed a non-spatially selective suppression during the saccade epoch. Taken together, these results suggest that motor plans leading to saccades may be generated internally within the FEF from local activity represented by gamma activity.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the NATL ACAD SCIENCES, 2101 CONSTITUTION AVE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20418 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Centre for Neuroscience
UG Programme
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2017 06:23
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2017 06:23
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/57265

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