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Sex and diversity: The mutualistic and parasitic fungi of a fungus-growing termite differ in genetic diversity and reproductive strategy

Katariya, Lakshya and Ramesh, Priya B and Gopalappa, Thejashwini and Borges, Renee M (2017) Sex and diversity: The mutualistic and parasitic fungi of a fungus-growing termite differ in genetic diversity and reproductive strategy. In: FUNGAL ECOLOGY, 26 . pp. 20-27.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.funeco.2016.11.003

Abstract

Sex in symbionts is useful in creating beneficial traits. However, the resultant decrease in genetic relatedness between symbionts can be potentially detrimental for mutualistic interactions such as those between fungus-growing termites and the cultivated fungi in the genus Termitomyces, where the termite host should try to increase intra-nest symbiont relatedness to increase crop productivity. Any parasites of this mutualism such as the fungi in the sub-genus Pseudoxylaria may also use sex to generate variation to counter evolving host defensive mechanisms. Using molecular phylogenetic tools, we found within-nest genetic homogeneity in Termitomyces species but not in Pseudoxylaria species associated with the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes obesus. There was lower OTU but higher genotypic diversity (within the most abundant OTU) in the genus Termitomyces than in the sub-genus Pseudoxylaria. Additionally, population genetics methods suggest a sexual population structure for Termitomyces species and clonal propagation for Pseudoxylaria species. This is the first study to investigate the population genetics of the symbiotic fungi associated with the genus Odontotermes from India. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the ELSEVIER SCI LTD, THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Centre for Ecological Sciences
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 20 May 2017 04:36
Last Modified: 25 Feb 2019 12:35
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/56865

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