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Design and Electro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of High Temperature Molybdenum Microheaters for Exhaust Gas Sensing Applications

Rao, Rajeswara LL and Singha, MK and Kiruba, MS and Nagaraju, J (2015) Design and Electro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of High Temperature Molybdenum Microheaters for Exhaust Gas Sensing Applications. In: International Conference on Smart Technologies and Management for Computing, Communication, Controls, Energy and Materials (ICSTM), MAY 06-08, 2015, Chennai, INDIA, pp. 624-628.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICSTM.2015.7225489

Abstract

Microheaters play a vital role in gas sensor applications. Exhaust gas sensors need high temperature microheaters to heat sensing films uniformly at low powers. In this paper, we present design and electro-thermo-mechanical analysis of molybdenum microheaters suitable for high temperature exhaust gas sensors. Double-spiral (DS), double-meander (DM), cross-meander (CS), modified-S (MS) and modified double spiral (MDS) shape structures were considered for simulation. The geometry of the resistive structure was optimized to improve temperature uniformity over a heating area of 500 X 500 mu m(2). Simulations show that the microheater consumed 83.65 mW power to reach a maximum temperature of 800 degrees C with a temperature gradient of 8.2 degrees C. Structural deformation of the microheater membrane was studied to determine its stability and reliability under high thermal stresses. The maximum membrane deformation was found to be 15.25 mu m at 800 degrees C. Platinum, tungsten and molybdenum microheaters were compared in terms of their power consumption, temperature gradient and membrane deformations.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Additional Information: Copy right for this article belongs to the IEEE, 345 E 47TH ST, NEW YORK, NY 10017 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Physical & Mathematical Sciences > Instrumentation Appiled Physics
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2016 07:00
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2016 07:00
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/54796

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