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Purifying water containing both anionic and cationic species using a (Zn, Cu)O, ZnO, and Cobalt Ferrite based multiphase adsorbent system

Jacob, Niya Mary and Kuruva, Praveena and Madras, Giridhar and Thomas, Tiju (2013) Purifying water containing both anionic and cationic species using a (Zn, Cu)O, ZnO, and Cobalt Ferrite based multiphase adsorbent system. In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 52 (46). pp. 16384-16395.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ie402727z

Abstract

For the purpose of water purification, novel and low-cost adsorbents which are promising replacements for activated carbon are being actively pursued. However, a single-phase material that adsorbs both cationic and anionic species remains elusive. Hence, a low-cost, multiphase adsorbent bed that purifies water containing both anionic and cationic pollutants is a desirable alternative. We choose anionic (Congo red, Orange G) and cationic (methylene blue, malachite green) dyes as model pollutants. These dyes are chosen since they are widely found in effluents from textile, leather, fishery, and pharmaceutical industries, and their carcinogenic, mutagenic, genotoxic, and cytotoxic impact on mammalian cells is well-established. We show that ZnO, (Zn0.24Cu0.76)O and cobalt ferrite based multiphase fixed adsorbent bed efficiently adsorbs model anionic (Congo red, Orange G) and cationic (methylene blue and malachite green) pollutants, and their complex mixtures. All adsorbent phases are synthesized using room-temperature, high-yield (similar to 96-100%), green chemical processes. The nanoadsorbents are characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, and zeta potential measurements. The constituent nanophases are deliberately chosen to be beyond 50 nm, in order to avoid the nanotoxic size regime of oxides. Adsorption characteristics of each of the phases are examined. Isotherm based analysis shows that adsorption is both spontaneous and highly favorable. zeta potential measurements indicate that electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the observed adsorption behavior. The isotherms obtained are best described using a composite Langmuir-Freundlich model. Pseudo-first-order, rapid kinetics is observed (with adsorption rate constants as high as 0.1-0.2 min(-1) in some cases). Film diffusion is shown to be the primary mechanism of adsorption.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to American Chemical Society.
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > Materials Research Centre
Division of Mechanical Sciences > Chemical Engineering
Depositing User: Francis Jayakanth
Date Deposited: 30 Dec 2013 12:26
Last Modified: 30 Dec 2013 12:26
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/48060

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