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Metal and Alloy Nanoparticles by Amine-Borane Reduction of Metal Salts by Solid-Phase Synthesis: Atom Economy and Green Process

Sanyal, Udishnu and Jagirdar, Balaji R (2012) Metal and Alloy Nanoparticles by Amine-Borane Reduction of Metal Salts by Solid-Phase Synthesis: Atom Economy and Green Process. In: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 51 (23). pp. 13023-13033.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic3021436

Abstract

A new solid state synthetic route has been developed toward metal and bimetallic alloy nanoparticles from metal salts employing amine-boranes, as the reducing agent. During the reduction, amine-borane plays a dual role: acts as a reducing agent and reduces the metal salts to their elemental form and simultaneously generates a stabilizing agent in situ which controls the growth of the particles and stabilizes them in the nanosize regime. Employing different amine-boranes with differing reducing ability (ammonia borane (AB), dimethylamine borane (DMAB), and triethylamine borane (TMAB)) was found to have a profound effect on the particle size and the size distribution. Usage of AB as the reducing agent provided the smallest possible size with best size distribution. Employment of TMAB also afforded similar results; however, when DMAB was used as the reducing agent it resulted in larger sized nanoparticles that are polydisperse too. In the AB mediated reduction, BNHx polymer generated in situ acts as a capping agent whereas, the complexing amine of the other amine-boranes (DMAB and TMAB) play the same role. Employing the solid state route described herein, monometallic Au, Ag, Cu, Pd, and Ir and bimetallic CuAg and CuAu alloy nanoparticles of <10 nm were successfully prepared. Nucleation and growth processes that control the size and the size distribution of the resulting nanoparticles have been elucidated in these systems.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright for this article belongs to AMER CHEMICAL SOC, WASHINGTON, USA
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > Inorganic & Physical Chemistry
Depositing User: Francis Jayakanth
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2013 06:50
Last Modified: 03 Jan 2013 06:50
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/45575

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