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Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

Anamika, Krishanpal and Garnier, Nicolas and Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy (2009) Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome. In: BMC Genomics, 10 .

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Official URL: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/10/622

Abstract

Background: Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results: Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions: Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright for this article belongs to BioMed Central.
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Molecular Biophysics Unit
Depositing User: Id for Latest eprints
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2010 07:20
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 05:54
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ac.in/id/eprint/25491

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